Audio Guide for The Tragedy of the St. Louis

Dublin Core

Title

Audio Guide for The Tragedy of the St. Louis
Audioguía de La Tragedia de St. Louis

Subject

Immigration

Description

This audio guide includes descriptions of each of the exhibit's eight panels in English as well as Spanish.
Esta audioguía incluye descripciones de cada uno de los ocho paneles de la exhibición en inglés y en español.

Creator

Museum of History and Holocaust Education

Source

Kennesaw State University

Publisher

Museum of History and Holocaust Education

Date

November 20, 2020

Contributor

Adina Langer

Rights

All Rights Reserved

Relation

The Tragedy of the St. Louis
La Tragedia de St. Louis

Format

mp3

Language

English
Spanish

Type

Sound

Coverage

Before the War

Sound Item Type Metadata

Transcription

Audio Guide for The Tragedy of the St. Louis


English:


Introduction

The following audio guide was created for The Tragedy of the St. Louis, an 8-panel traveling exhibit curated by the Museum of History and Holocaust Education. The exhibit, and the audio guide, is available in English and Spanish.


Audio Guide for The Tragedy of the St. Louis, Panel 1:

The Tragedy of the St. Louis.


The top section of the panel features a black and white image of a large ship docked in a harbor. Flags are waving from the ship’s masts, and black smoke is billowing from the smokestacks of tugboats in the foreground near the large ship. The image is captioned: Postcard of the M.S. St. Louis luxury liner in Hamburg harbor, 1939. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Courtesy of Gerri Felder, Photo by Max Reid.


The center part of the panel features an image of a brown leather suitcase. It is captioned:Carry-on suitcase used by a young German Jewish woman aboard the M.S. St. Louis, 1939. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Collection, Gift of Anne Wascou.


The main panel text reads as follows: 

The St. Louis tells a story of hope. In May 1939, more than 900 German Jewish refugees boarded a ship bound for Cuba. Despite Nazi hatred, they believed in a place that would value their humanity. The St. Louis tells a story of despair. The Cuban government refused to let the ship land. The United States and Canada refused to bend immigration rules. The ship returned to Europe. The St. Louis tells a story of persistence. Granted asylum in England, France, Belgium, and the Netherlands, almost three quarters of the refugees survived the war. Yet, a quarter perished in the Holocaust, making the St. Louis story a tragedy. The tragedy serves as a warning to the world as people continue to seek refuge from danger.


The bottom section of the panel includes a sepia-tone studio portrait of a family. It is captioned: Karl, Hildegard, Ruth, Edith, Ilse, and Selma Simon, Germany, ca. 1930s. Courtesy Susan Heineman Berman.


The text of the bottom section reads: The St. Louis story resonates across generations. For the Simon family, it was one episode in a saga that touches on the varied human drama of the Jewish experience. Follow the Simon family across these panels as they flee their home in Germany, hoping for a better life.


Beneath this bottom section, the logo for Kennesaw State University Museums, Archives and Rare Books, Museum of History and Holocaust Education appears. It includes a gold-colored S entwined around a K with the rest of the text in white on the blue water background of the panel. 


The panels all include a blue water background at the top and bottom with a main section overlaid by shades of purple, and a bottom section overlaid in teal. English text appears on the left and Spanish text appears on the right. 


Audio Guide for the Tragedy of the St. Louis, Panel 2:

The St. Louis in Chronological Context. 


This panel features a timeline with dates in the center and English text on the left and Spanish text on the right. 


There is an image at the center of the panel showing people walking in front of a shop on a city street. The German words Herrer Kleidung are visible above the entrance. The shop window has been broken, and there is glass scattered inside the open display area. The image caption reads: A woman and child pass a looted Jewish shop in Madgeburg, Germany after Kristallnacht, November 1938. Courtesy German Federal Archives Bundesarchiv, Bild 146-1970-083-44, Photo by H. Friedrich..


The timeline reads as follows:


1902: Cuba becomes an independent republic following the Spanish-American war and four years as U.S. protectorate.


1924: U.S. passes Johnson-Reed Immigration Act setting strict immigration quotas for countries in the Eastern Hemisphere.


1933: Adolf Hitler becomes Chancellor then Fuhrer in Germany; Franklin Roosevelt becomes President of the United States.


1935: Germany passes Nuremberg Race Laws which define Jews as non-ctizens and restrict their rights within Germany.


December 24, 1936: Federico Laredo Bru becomes President of Cuba


July 6-15, 1938: Evian Conference convened in France. Delegates from 32 countries discuss plight of Jewish refugees fleeing Nazi persecution, but only the Dominican Republic agrees to accept more refugees.


November 9-10, 1938: Kristallnacht (Night of Broken Glass) pogrom perpetrated by agents of the Nazi government in Germany.


November 15, 1938: British, Jewish, and Quaker leaders appeal to U.K. Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain to temporarily accept refugee children, leading to the kindertransport of almost 10,000 children.


February 9, 1939: U.S. fails to pass Wagner-Rogers Refugee Aid Bill which would have helped German Jewish children.


January-May 1939: 937 people book passage on the M.S. St. Louis, a German luxury-liner. Refugees hoping to wait in Cuba for U.S. visas also purchase landing permits from Cuban Director-General of Immigration Manuel Benitez Gonzalez.


May 8, 1939: An antisemitic, anti-immigrant demonstration in Cuba helps convince President Bru to cancel the Benitez landing permits. Passengers are not informed.


May 13, 1939: The St. Louis departs Hamburg with 931 refugees aboard, including four members of the Simon family, on a doomed journey, bound for Cuba and rejection. 


The panels all include a blue water background at the top and bottom with a main section overlaid by shades of purple, and a bottom section overlaid in teal. English text appears on the left and Spanish text appears on the right. 


Audio Guide for the Tragedy of the St. Louis, Panel  3:

The Politics of Immigration


There is a chart at the top of the panel showing a group of men depicted as descending in size across the page from left to right. The title of the chart is Foreign-Born Population in the United States in 1920, and each man is depicted wearing traditional clothing from his country of origin. From left to right, the chart is labeled: Germany, 1,683,298; Italy, 1,607,458; Russia, 1,398,999; Poland, 1,139,578; Great Britain, 1,133,967; Canada, 1,117,136; Ireland, 1,035,680; Sweden, 624,759; Austria, 574,959; Mexico, 476,676; Hungary 397,081; Norway, 363,599; Denmark, 189,051; Greece, 175,792; France, 152,792; Finland, 149,262; Holland, 131,262; Switzerland, 118,647; Asia, 110,586; Roumania, 103,007. The image is captioned: Illustration for an article about “an alien anti-dumping” bill in the Literary Digest, May 7, 1921, showing a graph of the foreign-born population in the U.S. in 1920. Courtesy Library of Congress.


The main text of the panel reads as follows. World War I marked a rise in nationalism and xenophobia that only intensified with the start of the Great Depression in 1929. During the 1920s, nations passed restrictive immigration legislation, seeking to define their citizenry and assert their sovereignty. The United States withdrew from a period of expansionist foreign policy, and its neighbors, including Cuba, sought to define themselves as independent and distinct. The Great Depression led people across the world to seek new leadership, and to find people to blame for their economic hardship, including political opponents and “outsiders.” When conditions for Jews became intolerable in Germany, refugees were met with a toxic mix of antisemitism, anti-immigrant sentiment, and associations with both Communism and Capitalism. 


The bottom section of the panel includes a black and white photograph of two girls wearing identical flower-print dresses. They are standing next to a man who is holding the reins of a brown horse with a white nose. There is a fence in front of a group of brick buildings in the background. The photograph is captioned: Hildegard and Ruth Simon with their horse and his trainer, Cloppenburg, Germany, ca. 1930s. The girls were only 15 months apart in age. Courtesy Susan Heinneman Berman.


The text of this section reads as follows: The Simon family was well established in Cloppenburg, Germany, when Hitler came to power in 1933. Karl Simon was a successful and well-liked cattle breeder and horse trader. His daughters attended a parochial school during the week and enjoyed carriage rides and ice cream after Shabbat services on Saturdays. 


The panels all include a blue water background at the top and bottom with a main section overlaid by shades of purple, and a bottom section overlaid in teal. English text appears on the left and Spanish text appears on the right. 

Audio Guide for The Tragedy of the St. Louis, Panel 4:

Fleeing the Third Reich


There is a black and white photograph at the top of the panel showing a group of frowning dressed in hats and coats being led through the streets of a town by soldiers in uniform. Some townspeople walk alongside the parade including two young women who smile at the photographer. The photograph is captioned: Members of the SA arrest Jewish men from Oldenburg, Germany, the location of the Simon sisters’ Jewish school, November 9-10, 1938. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Courtesy of Abraham Levi. 


In the center near the top of the main section of the panel is a reproduction of an Immigrant Identification Card from the United States Department of Labor. The card is pale green and includes a black and white photograph of a young man with dark hair and glasses, wearing a jacket and striped tie. The card indicates that the man was born on August 7, 1922, in Germany, is of German nationality and has brown eyes. The card also indicates that the man came on a steamer from Hamburg as an immigrant and arrived in New York on July 21, 1939. The card is signed by Manfred Heinemann as well as the immigrant inspector. The image is captioned: Manfred Heinemann was one of the lucky German Jews whose U.S. visa came through. Imprisoned in Dachau on Kristallnacht, he was released when his mother presented his emigration documents. He would go on to serve in the U.S. Army and then to marry Ruth Simon. 1939 Immigrant Identification Card courtesy Susan Heinemann Berman.


The main text of the panel reads as follows: 


Kristallnacht, or the “Night of Broken Glass,” made rising anti-Jewish sentiment and the regime of violence and restriction in Germany impossible for the world to ignore. Jewish businesses were looted, Jewish homes were vandalized, and synagogues were left to burn. More than 100 Jews were killed, and 30,000 Jewish men were arrested and given an ultimatum: leave the country or lose everything. Yet, Adolf Hitler and the Nazis bet on the world’s indifference. The failure of the Evian Conference to find homes for Jewish refugees emboldened the regime to make its murderous plans for the Jews visible. Hitler believed that the world would maintain its immigration restrictions, even when faced with a clear and present danger. Overwhelmingly, he was right.


The bottom section of the panel includes a black and white photograph of five young women standing arm-in-arm on a city street. It is captioned, Hildegard and Ruth Simon, second and fourth from left, with friends in England, ca. 1930s. Courtesy Susan Heinemann Berman.


The text for the bottom section of the panel reads as follows: On November 10, 1938, Ruth Simon left for school and saw instead a burning synagogue. Back home she found her father arrested and her mother and sisters weeping in their vandalized house. Selma Simon could only send two of her children on the kindertransport to England, so she chose Ruth and Hildegard, her middle daughters. 


The panels all include a blue water background at the top and bottom with a main section overlaid by shades of purple, and a bottom section overlaid in teal. English text appears on the left and Spanish text appears on the right. 


Audio Guide for The Tragedy of the St. Louis, Panel 5:

The Voyage


A black and white photograph at the top of the panel depicts a group of passengers on the deck of a ship. The words St. Lois and Ham are visible on a lifeboat in the background. Three men of varying ages wearing coats and ties stand behind two young women and a man dressed all in white with a white cap. The young women are smiling and wearing sunglasses, snuggled together beneath a blanket. The photograph is captioned: Ilse and Edith Simon relaxing on the deck of the St. Louis with other passengers, may 1939. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Collection, Gift of Reuben Babich. 


An image at the top center of the main body of the panel shows a black and white sailor’s cap with an insignia in the middle of a blue and white flag surrounded by sheaves of wheat. It is captioned: Cap worn by Gustav Schroeder, captain of the St. Louis. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Courtesy of Berbert & Vera Karliner, Photo by Max Reid.


The main text of the panel reads as follows: Of the 937 passengers who left Hamburg aboard the St. Louis on May 13, 1939, all but six were Jewish refugees. They were the lucky ones who had enough money to purchase round-trip tickets, as well as landing permits from the Cuban government, even after the Nazis' efforts over the previous four years to strip them of status, property, and livelihood. They hoped for a brief wait in Cuba until their U.S. visa quota numbers came up. In the meantime, they looked forward to an enjoyable voyage. Captain Schroeder showed compassion for the refugees, informing his German crew to treat them with respect and 

dignity. Passengers were hopeful and well rested as they sailed into Havana Harbor on May 27. 


There is a black and white photograph in the center of the bottom part of the panel showing a group of people wearing hats and coats and carrying suitcases walking across the gangplank of a ship with the letters H-A-M-B clearly visible in white. It is captioned: Selma, Karl, Ilse, and Edith Simon board the St. Louis in Hamburg, Germany, May 1939. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Collection, Gift of Reuben Babich.


The text of the bottom part of the panel reads as follows: With Ruth and Hildegard safely dispatched to Dovercourt, England, and their father, Karl, returned from the Sachsenhausen concentration camp, the remaining members of the Simon family booked passage on the St. Louis. Edith and Ilse enjoyed ocean breezes and birthday parties, looking forward to an eventual reunion with their sisters in America.


The panels all include a blue water background at the top and bottom with a main section overlaid by shades of purple, and a bottom section overlaid in teal. English text appears on the left and Spanish text appears on the right. 


Audio Guide for The Tragedy of the St. Louis, Panel 6:

Refuge Denied


A black and white photograph at the top of the panel depicts a crowd of women, children, and men smiling and waving while looking over the railing of a ship. It is captioned: Jewish refugees aboard the St. Louis returning to Europe in June 1939. Courtesy JDC Archives.


A black and white photograph at the top center of the main body of the panel shows the low skyline of a city with cars on a street in front of a grand monument. Some of the buildings have domes and columns. There are people standing on a dock overlooking the water. The image is captioned: View of Havana skyline from the deck of the St. Louis, May 1939. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Courtesy of Fred (Fritz) Vendig.


The main text of the panel reads as follows: Instead of a welcome gangplank, the passengers of the St. Louis were met with patrol boats that prevented landing. Cuban President Bru had invalidated all landing permits issued by his political rival, Manuel Benitez Gonzalez. Only 28 passengers were permitted to land. Supported by the captain, passengers teamed up with the Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) to negotiate on behalf of the refugees. After the Cuban government demanded exorbitant fees to admit the refugees, the St. Louis sailed north along the coast of Miami. A telegram sent to President Roosevelt failed to convince him to make an exception for the passengers. However, negotiators were successful in securing asylum in England, France, Belgium, and the Netherlands. The ship sailed back to Europe on June 6, 1939. 


There is a black and white photograph in the center of the bottom part of the panel showing two girls seated beside each other on a bench. They are both wearing white dresses with floral patterns and smiling. The older girl has her arm around the younger, and the younger girl has one hand in front of her left eye to block the sun. The image is captioned: Edith and Ilse Simon, aboard the St. Louis, May-June 1939. Courtesy Susan Heinemann Berman.


The text of the bottom part of the panel reads as follows: Although they hoped to go to England, the Simon family was admitted to the Netherlands instead. Soon after, Edith was able to go to England as a nanny. From there she made it to the United States. Karl, Selma, and Ilse remained in the Netherlands. 


The panels all include a blue water background at the top and bottom with a main section overlaid by shades of purple, and a bottom section overlaid in teal. English text appears on the left and Spanish text appears on the right. 


Audio Guide for The Tragedy of the St. Louis, Panel 7:

The Passengers


There is a map at the top of the panel titled Hamburg-America Linie M.S. St. Louis. The map includes the east coast of North America and the west coast of Europe and Africa. Between the two coasts, the map shows the pathway of a ship with a double triangle and crown symbol marking locations on particular days from a May 16 departure into open ocean to a June 6 departure from Havana, Cuba, to a June 15 approach to the European coast. The bottom part of the map includes an inset image of a large ship with flags on its masts and the words Hamburg, May 13. - 1939- Antwerp June 17. The map is captioned: Map of the journey of the St. Louis, May - June 1939. Courtesy JDC Archives.


Below the map is a pie chart entitled: St. Louis Passenger Survival Rates by Nation of Disembarkation. The pie chart is divided into five sections. Beginning at the top right and going clockwise, there is a blue section labeled: Belgium, 214 passengers. It shows that 60% were survivors and 40% were fatalities. The next section is colored orange and labeled: Cuba, 28 passengers. It shows 100% survivors. The next section is colored pink and is labeled: England, 289 passengers. It shows 100% survivors. The next section is colored green and labeled: France, 224 passengers. It shows 62% survivors and 38% fatalities. The final section is colored yellow and is labeled: Netherlands, 181 passengers. It shows 54% survivors and 46% fatalities. 


Beneath the pie chart is a caption which reads: Of the 937 passengers on the St. Louis, 931 were refugees. Divided among Cuba, England, France, Belgium, and Netherlands, 72% of the refugees survived the war while 28% perished. 


The bottom section of the panel includes a black and white photograph depicting a girl standing beside her father and mother in front of a brick building. The photograph is scratched or faded, blurring the lines between the three figures wearing dark clothing. It is captioned: Ilse, Karl, and Selma Simon in the Netherlands, ca. 1940-1942. Courtesy Susan Heinemann Berman. 


The text of the bottom section of the panel reads as follows: Ruth and Hildegard received a letter from their mother in 1943 in which she advised them to “be strong and work efficiently.” Ilse added a note in which she declared, “I am as tall as mother!” Only after the war did Ruth and Hildegard learn that their parents and younger sister had been murdered at Sobibor on May 21, 1943. 


The panels all include a blue water background at the top and bottom with a main section overlaid by shades of purple, and a bottom section overlaid in teal. English text appears on the left and Spanish text appears on the right. 

Audio Guide for The Tragedy of the St. Louis, Panel 8:

The Legacy of the St. Louis


A black and white photograph at the top of the panel depicts a young man in a white shirt and cap roller-skating across the wooden deck of a ship. A group of men and women stand and chat behind him. The photograph is captioned: Jewish refugee Georg Lenneberg roller skates on the deck of the St. Louis, May 13-17, 1939. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Courtesy of Fred Buff. 


At the top center of the main part of the panel, there is a reproduction of a child’s drawing of a ship. The ship has a black hull and white decks with a large blue anchor on its stern and St. Louis written in red on its bow. Flying above the ship are flags of various nationalities including Germany and Cuba. Written in yellow, red, and blue at the bottom of the picture are the words The German Ship St. Louis from Habana to Antw. The images is captioned: Drawing by 11-year-old Liesel Joseph in August 1939 after arriving in England following the forced return of the St. Louis from Cuba. United States Holocaust memorial Museum Collection, Gift of Liesel Joseph Loeb.  


The main body text reads as follows: The hope and uncertainty felt by the St. Louis passengers can be seen in the photographs they took of each other aboard the ship. They are smiling, dancing, roller-skating, auditioning to be neighbors and friends in a new world. To the people who followed their plight, they were real individuals with personalities and potential. Yet, to the nations where they sought solace, they were numbers beyond a quota. And that quota could not be changed, held fast by fears, distractions, and the inaction of politicians, erasing any traces of humanity.The story of the St. Louis reminds us that rhetoric and policy are powerful. For people seeking refuge, restrictive policies can have the power to end their lives prematurely. 


There is a color photograph in the center of the bottom section of the panel showing four smiling women in front of a window. A young woman stands on the left beside three older women with short hair and glasses who closely resemble each other. The image is captioned: Susan Heinemann Berman, Ruth Simon Heinemann, Edith Simon Babich, and Hildegard Simon Gernsheimer, 1990. Courtesy Susan Heinemann Berman.


The text of the bottom section of the panel reads as follows: The three surviving Simon sisters cheered the end of World War II and sought the American dream. In 1947, Ruth married Manfred Heinemann. A year later, their daughter Susan was born. Now a resident of Kennesaw, Georgia, Susan Heinemann Berman has helped preserve her family’s legacy. 


The panels all include a blue water background at the top and bottom with a main section overlaid by shades of purple, and a bottom section overlaid in teal. English text appears on the left and Spanish text appears on the right. 


Spanish:


Introducción



La siguiente audioguía fue creada para La tragedia de St. Louis, una exhibición itinerante de 8 paneles curada por el Museo de Historia y Educación sobre el Holocausto. La exhibición y la audioguía están disponibles en inglés y español.



Audioguía de La tragedia de St. Louis, Panel 1:

La Tragedia del St. Louis



La sección superior del panel presenta una imagen en blanco y negro de un gran barco atracado en un puerto. Las banderas ondean desde los mástiles del barco y el humo negro se eleva desde las chimeneas de los remolcadores en primer plano cerca del gran barco. La imagen está subtitulada: Postal del transatlántico de lujo M.S. St. Louis en el puerto de Hamburgo, 1939. Museo Estadounidense Conmemorativo del Holocausto. Cortesía de Gerri Felder. Foto de Max Reid


La parte central del panel presenta una imagen de una maleta de cuero marrón. Está subtitulado: Equipaje de mano usado por una joven mujer judía alemana a bordo del M.S. St. Louis, 1939. Colección en el Museo Estadounidense Conmemorativo del Holocausto. Regalo de Anne Wascou.


El texto del panel principal dice lo siguiente:

E l St. Louis cuenta una historia de esperanza. En mayo de 1939, más de 900 refugiados judíos alemanes abordaron un barco cuyo destino era Cuba. A pesar del odio nazi, ellos creyeron en un mundo que valoraría su humanidad. El St. Louis cuenta una historia de desesperanza. El gobierno cubano se negó a que el barco desembarcara. Los Estados Unidos y Canadá se negaron a quebrantar las reglas de inmigración. El barco volvió a Europa. El St. Louis cuenta una historia de persistencia. Casi tres cuartas partes de los refugiados sobrevivieron a la guerra gracias al asilo otorgado en Inglaterra, Francia, Bélgica y los Países Bajos. Sin embargo, una cuarta parte falleció en el holocausto, convirtiendo la historia del St. Louis en una tragedia. La tragedia sirve como una advertencia para el mundo mientras las personas continúan buscando refugio ante el peligro.



La sección inferior del panel incluye un retrato de estudio en tono sepia de una familia. Está subtitulado:

Karl, Hildegard, Ruth, Edith, Ilse y Selma Simon. Alemania. Los años 30. Cortesía de Susan Heinneman Berman


El texto de la sección inferior dice: The St. Louis story resonates across generations. For the Simon family, it was one episode in a saga that touches on the varied human drama of the Jewish experience. Follow the Simon family across these panels as they flee their home in Germany, hoping for a better life.La historia del St. Louis resuena a lo largo de las generaciones. Para la familia Simon, este fue un episodio de una saga que trata el diverso drama humano experimentado por los judíos. A través de estos paneles siga a los integrantes de la familia Simon mientras huyen de su casa en Alemania, esperando tener una vida mejor. 


Debajo de esta sección inferior, aparece el logotipo de los museos, archivos y libros raros de la Universidad Estatal de Kennesaw, Museo de Historia y Educación sobre el Holocausto. Incluye una S de color dorado entrelazada alrededor de una K con el resto del texto en blanco sobre el fondo de agua azul del panel.


Todos los paneles incluyen un fondo de agua azul en la parte superior e inferior con una sección principal superpuesta por tonos de púrpura y una sección inferior superpuesta en verde azulado. El texto en inglés aparece a la izquierda y el texto en español a la derecha.




Audioguía de La tragedia de St. Louis, Panel 2:

El St. Louis en el Contexto Cronológico



Este panel presenta una línea de tiempo con fechas en el centro y texto en inglés a la izquierda y texto en español a la derecha.




Hay una imagen en el centro del panel que muestra a personas caminando frente a una tienda en una calle de la ciudad. Las palabras en alemán Herrer Kleidung son visibles sobre la entrada. El escaparate se ha roto y hay cristales esparcidos dentro del área de exhibición abierta. La leyenda de la imagen dice:  Una mujer y un niño pasan por una tienda judía saqueada en Magdeburgo, Alemania, después de Kristallnacht. Noviembre 1938. Cortesía del Archivo Federal de Alemania Bundesarchiv, Bild 146-1970-083-44, Foto de H. Friedrich


La línea de tiempo dice lo siguiente:


1902: Cuba se convierte en una república independiente después de la guerra hispano- estadounidense, y de cuatro años como un protectorado de Estados Unidos.


1924: EE.UU. aprueba la Ley de Inmigración Johnson-Reed estableciendo cupos estrictos de inmigración para países en el hemisferio este. 


1933: Adolf Hitler se convierte en Canciller y luego en Führer en Alemania. Franklin Roosevelt se convierte en Presidente de los Estados Unidos.


1935: Alemania aprueba las Leyes Raciales de Núremberg que definen a los judíos como no ciudadanos y restringen sus derechos dentro de Alemania.


24 de diciembre, 1936: Federico Laredo Bru se convierte en Presidente de Cuba.


6-15 de julio, 1938: La Conferencia de Evian se llevó a cabo en Francia. Delegados de 32 países dialogan sobre la difícil condición de los refugiados judíos que huyen de la persecución nazi, pero solo República Dominicana está de acuerdo con aceptar a más refugiados. 


9-10 de noviembre 1938: Kristallnacht (La Noche de los Cristales Rotos). Matanza perpetrada por agentes del gobierno nazi en Alemania.


15 de noviembre, 1938: Los líderes británicos, judíos y cuáqueros recurren al Primer Ministro de Reino Unido, Neville Chamberlain, para que acepte temporalmente a niños refugiados, dando como resultado el Kindertransport, que es el traslado de casi 10,000 niños.


9 de febrero, 1939: EE.UU. no aprueba el Proyecto de Ley de Ayuda para Refugiados Wagner-Rogers, el cual hubiese ayudado a los niños judíos alemanes.


enero-mayo 1939: 937 personas reservan su pasaje en el M.S. St. Louis, un transatlántico alemán de lujo. Los refugiados con la ilusión de esperar en Cuba la obtención de visas estadounidenses también compran permisos de desembarco del Director General de Inmigración cubano, Manuel Benitez Gonzalez.


8 de mayo, 1939: Una manifestación antisemita y antiinmigrante en Cuba ayuda a convencer al Presidente Bru de la cancelación de los permisos de desembarco de Benitez. Los pasajeros no saben nada al respecto.


13 de mayo, 1939: TEl St. Louis parte de Hamburgo con 931 refugiados abordo, incluyendo cuatro miembros de la familia Simon. Este fue un viaje con destino a Cuba condenado al fracaso y rechazo.


Todos los paneles incluyen un fondo de agua azul en la parte superior e inferior con una sección principal superpuesta por tonos de púrpura y una sección inferior superpuesta en verde azulado. El texto en inglés aparece a la izquierda y el texto en español a la derecha.


Audioguía de La tragedia de St. Louis, Panel 3:

La Política sobre Inmigración



Hay una tabla en la parte superior del panel que muestra un grupo de hombres representados con un tamaño descendente en la página de izquierda a derecha. El título de la tabla es Población nacida en el extranjero en los Estados Unidos en 1920, y cada hombre está representado con ropa tradicional de su país de origen. De izquierda a derecha, el gráfico está etiquetado: Alemania, 1.683.298; Italia, 1.607.458; Rusia, 1.398.999; Polonia, 1.139.578; Gran Bretaña, 1.133.967; Canadá, 1.117.136; Irlanda, 1.035.680; Suecia, 624.759; Austria, 574,959; México, 476,676; Hungría 397.081; Noruega, 363.599; Dinamarca, 189.051; Grecia, 175.792; Francia, 152.792; Finlandia, 149.262; Holanda, 131.262; Suiza, 118.647; Asia, 110.586; Rumania, 103.007. La imagen está subtitulada: Ilustración para un artículo sobre un proyecto de ley “antidumping extranjero” en “Literary Digest”, 7 de mayo de 1921, mostrando un gráfico de la población nacida en el extranjero que estaba en EE.UU. en 1920. Cortesía de la Biblioteca del Congreso


El texto principal del panel dice lo siguiente. La Primera Guerra Mundial marcó un incremento del nacionalismo y la xenofobia que se intensificó únicamente con el inicio de la Gran Depresión en 1929. Durante los años 20, las naciones aprobaron una legislación de inmigración restrictiva, buscando definir su ciudadanía y afirmar su soberanía. Estados Unidos se retiró un tiempo de la política exterior expansionista, y sus vecinos, incluyendo Cuba, buscaron definirse como independientes. La Gran Depresión provocó que las personas alrededor del mundo busquen un nuevo liderazgo, y encuentren a quien culpar de sus problemas económicos, incluyendo a oponentes políticos y a forasteros. Cuando las condiciones para los judíos llegaron a ser intolerables en Alemania, los refugiados experimentaron una mezcla tóxica de antisemitismo, sentimiento antiinmigrante y asociaciones con el comunismo y el capitalismo.


La sección inferior del panel incluye una fotografía en blanco y negro de dos niñas con vestidos idénticos con estampado de flores. Están de pie junto a un hombre que sostiene las riendas de un caballo marrón con la nariz blanca. Hay una valla frente a un grupo de edificios de ladrillo al fondo. La fotografía está subtitulada: Hildegard y Ruth Simon con su caballo y su entrenador, Cloppenburg, Alemania. Los años 30. Las niñas se llevaban solo 15 meses de diferencia entre ellas. Cortesía de Susan Heinneman Berman.


El texto de esta sección dice lo siguiente: La familia Simon estaba bien establecida en Cloppenburg, Alemania, cuando Hitler llegó al poder en 1933. Karl Simon era un exitoso y popular ganadero y comerciante de caballos. Sus hijas asistían a un colegio religioso durante la semana y disfrutaban de paseos en carruajes y helados después de los servicios de Shabat los sábados.. 


Todos los paneles incluyen un fondo de agua azul en la parte superior e inferior con una sección principal superpuesta por tonos de púrpura y una sección inferior superpuesta en verde azulado. El texto en inglés aparece a la izquierda y el texto en español a la derecha.


Audioguía de La tragedia de St. Louis, Panel 4

Escapando del Tercer Reich



Hay una fotografía en blanco y negro en la parte superior del panel que muestra a un grupo de personas con el ceño fruncido, vestidos con sombreros y abrigos, siendo conducidos por las calles de un pueblo por soldados uniformados. Algunos habitantes caminan junto al desfile, incluidas dos mujeres jóvenes que sonríen al fotógrafo. La fotografía está subtitulada:

Miembros de las SA arrestan a hombres judíos de Oldenburgo, Alemania, donde se ubicaba el colegio judío de las hermanas Simon. 9-10 de noviembre de 1938. Museo Estadounidense Conmemorativo del Holocausto. Cortesía de Abraham Levi


En el centro, cerca de la parte superior de la sección principal del panel, hay una reproducción de una tarjeta de identificación de inmigrante del Departamento de Trabajo de los Estados Unidos. La tarjeta es de color verde pálido e incluye una fotografía en blanco y negro de un joven de cabello oscuro y gafas, vestido con chaqueta y corbata a rayas. La tarjeta indica que el hombre nació el 7 de agosto de 1922 en Alemania, es de nacionalidad alemana y tiene ojos marrones. La tarjeta también indica que el hombre llegó en un vapor de Hamburgo como inmigrante y llegó a Nueva York el 21 de julio de 1939. La tarjeta está firmada por Manfred Heinemann y el inspector de inmigrantes. La imagen está subtitulada:


Manfred Heinemann fue uno de los judíos alemanes afortunados que obtuvo una visa estadounidense. Preso en Dachau durante Kristallnacht fue liberado cuando su madre presentó sus documentos de emigración. El partiría para servir en el ejército de los Estados Unidos, y luego se casaría con Ruth Simon. 1939. Tarjeta de Identificación de Inmigrante. Cortesía de Susan Heinemann Berman.


El texto principal del panel dice lo siguiente:



Kristallnacht o la “Noche de los Cristales Rotos” provocó un creciente sentimiento antijudío y un régimen de violencia y restricción en Alemania imposible de ser ignorado por el mundo. Los negocios judíos fueron saqueados, las casas judías fueron vandalizadas y las sinagogas fueron incendiadas. Más de 100 judíos fueron asesinados y 30,000 hombres judíos fueron arrestados y se les dio el ultimátum de abandonar el país o perderlo todo. Sin embargo, Adolf Hitler y los nazis apostaron por la indiferencia del mundo. El fracaso de la Conferencia de Evian al no encontrar morada para los refugiados judíos incentivó a que el régimen hiciese visibles sus planes homicidas con respecto a los judíos. Hitler creía que el mundo mantendría sus restricciones de inmigración, incluso al enfrentar un peligro inminente. Abrumadoramente, tuvo razón.


La sección inferior del panel incluye una fotografía en blanco y negro de cinco mujeres jóvenes de pie del brazo en una calle de la ciudad. Está subtitulado:  Hildegard y Ruth Simon, segunda y cuarta desde la izquierda, como amigas en Inglaterra. Los años 30. Cortesía de Susan Heinemann Berman.


El texto de la sección inferior del panel dice lo siguiente: El 10 de noviembre de 1938, Ruth Simon salió rumbo al colegio y en su lugar vio una sinagoga incendiándose. Al volver se enteró que su padre había sido arrestado y encontró a su madre y hermanas llorando en su casa vandalizada. Selma Simon solo pudo enviar a dos de sus hijas a Inglaterra en el kindertransport, así que eligió a Ruth y Hildegard, sus hijas del medio.


Todos los paneles incluyen un fondo de agua azul en la parte superior e inferior con una sección principal superpuesta por tonos de púrpura y una sección inferior superpuesta en verde azulado. El texto en inglés aparece a la izquierda y el texto en español a la derecha.



Audioguía de La tragedia de St. Louis, Panel 5:

El Viaje


Una fotografía en blanco y negro en la parte superior del panel muestra a un grupo de pasajeros en la cubierta de un barco. Las palabras St. Louis y Ham son visibles en un bote salvavidas en el fondo. Tres hombres de diferentes edades con abrigo y corbata están detrás de dos mujeres jóvenes y un hombre vestido todo de blanco con una gorra blanca. Las jóvenes sonríen y usan gafas de sol, acurrucadas juntas debajo de una manta. La fotografía está subtitulada: Ilse y Edith Simon relajándose en la cubierta del St. Louis con otros pasajeros. Mayo 1939. Colección en el Museo Estadounidense Conmemorativo del Holocausto. Regalo de Reuben Babich.


Una imagen en la parte superior central del cuerpo principal del panel muestra una gorra de marinero en blanco y negro con una insignia en el medio de una bandera azul y blanca rodeada de gavillas de trigo. Está subtitulado:


Gorra usada por Gustav Schroeder, capitán del St. Louis. Museo Estadounidense Conmemorativo del Holocausto. Cortesía de Herbert & Vera Karliner. Foto de Max Reid.


El texto principal del panel dice lo siguiente:


De los 937 pasajeros que dejaron Hamburgo a bordo del St. Louis el 13 de mayo de 1939, todos excepto por seis eran refugiados judíos. Ellos fueron los afortunados que tuvieron el dinero suficiente para comprar los pasajes de ida y vuelta, así como también los permisos de desembarco del gobierno cubano, incluso después de los esfuerzos de los nazis por privarlos del estatus, la propiedad y el sustento durante los cuatro años anteriores. Ellos esperaban quedarse un periodo corto en Cuba hasta obtener su cupo de visas estadounidenses. En el entretiempo, esperaban con ansias un viaje agradable. El capitán Schroeder demostró compasión por los refugiados, informándole a su tripulación alemana que los traten con respeto y dignidad. Los pasajeros estuvieron esperanzados y bien descansados cuando llegaron al puerto de La Habana el 27 de mayo. inminente. Abrumadoramente, tuvo razón.


Hay una fotografía en blanco y negro en el centro de la parte inferior del panel que muestra a un grupo de personas con sombreros y abrigos y maletas caminando por la pasarela de un barco con las letras H-A-M-B claramente visibles en blanco. Está subtitulado: Selma, Karl, Ilse y Edith Simon a bordo del St. Louis en Hamburgo, Alemania. Mayo 1939. Colección en el Museo Estadounidense Conmemorativo del Holocausto. Regalo de Reuben Babich.


El texto de la parte inferior del panel dice lo siguiente:


Con Ruth y Hildegard enviadas de manera segura a Dovercourt, Inglaterra, y con su padre, Karl, habiendo regresado del campo de concentración de Sachsenhausen, los miembros restantes de la familia Simon reservaron pasajes en el St. Louis. Edith e Ilse disfrutaban de la brisa del océano y de las fiestas de cumpleaños, esperando un futuro reencuentro con sus hermanas en América.


Todos los paneles incluyen un fondo de agua azul en la parte superior e inferior con una sección principal superpuesta por tonos de púrpura y una sección inferior superpuesta en verde azulado. El texto en inglés aparece a la izquierda y el texto en español a la derecha.



Audioguía de La tragedia de St. Louis, Panel 6:

Refugio Negado


Una fotografía en blanco y negro en la parte superior del panel muestra una multitud de mujeres, niños y hombres sonriendo y saludando mientras miran por encima de la barandilla de un barco. Está subtitulado: Refugiados judíos a bordo del St. Louis volviendo a Europa en junio 1939. Cortesía de los Archivos del JDC.


Una fotografía en blanco y negro en la parte superior central del cuerpo principal del panel muestra el horizonte bajo de una ciudad con autos en una calle frente a un gran monumento. Algunos de los edificios tienen cúpulas y columnas. Hay gente parada en un muelle con vistas al agua. La imagen está subtitulada:  Vista de La Habana desde la cubierta del St. Louis. Mayo 1939. Museo Estadounidense Conmemorativo del Holocausto. Cortesía de Fred [Fritz] Vendig.


El texto principal del panel dice lo siguiente:


En lugar de tener una rampa de desembarco de bienvenida, los pasajeros del St. Louis encontraron botes patrulleros que evitaron el desembarco. El Presidente cubano Bru había invalidado todos los permisos de desembarco emitidos por su rival político, Manuel Benitez Gonzalez. Solo 28 pasajeros tuvieron permiso para desembarcar. Apoyados por el capitán, los pasajeros unieron fuerzas con el Comité Judío de Distribución Conjunta (JDC) para negociar en representación de los refugiados. Después de que el gobierno cubano exigió exorbitantes pagos para admitir a los refugiados, el St. Louis zarpó hacia el norte a lo largo de la costa de Miami. Un telegrama enviado al presidente Roosevelt no logró convencerlo de hacer una excepción con respecto a los pasajeros. Sin embargo, los negociadores tuvieron éxito al asegurar el asilo en Inglaterra, Francia, Bélgica y los Países Bajos. El barco partió de regreso a Europa el 6 de junio de 1939.


Hay una fotografía en blanco y negro en el centro de la parte inferior del panel que muestra a dos niñas sentadas una al lado de la otra en un banco. Ambos llevan vestidos blancos con motivos florales y sonríen. La niña mayor tiene su brazo alrededor de la menor, y la menor tiene una mano frente a su ojo izquierdo para bloquear el sol. La imagen está subtitulada:


Edith y Ilse Simon a bordo del St. Louis. Mayo-Junio 1939. Cortesía de Susan Heinemann Berman


El texto de la parte inferior del panel dice lo siguiente:


A pesar de que esperaba ir a Inglaterra, la familia Simon fue admitida en los Países Bajos. Poco después, Edith pudo ir a Inglaterra como niñera. Desde ahí, ella se fue a Estados Unidos. Karl, Selma e Ilse permanecieron en los Países Bajos.


Todos los paneles incluyen un fondo de agua azul en la parte superior e inferior con una sección principal superpuesta por tonos de púrpura y una sección inferior superpuesta en verde azulado. El texto en inglés aparece a la izquierda y el texto en español a la derecha.



Audioguía de La tragedia de St. Louis, Panel 7

Los Pasajeros


Hay un mapa en la parte superior del panel titulado Hamburg-America Linie M.S. San Louis. El mapa incluye la costa este de América del Norte y la costa oeste de Europa y África. Entre las dos costas, el mapa muestra la ruta de un barco con un triángulo doble y el símbolo de una corona que marcan las ubicaciones en días particulares, desde una salida del 16 de mayo hacia mar abierto hasta una salida el 6 de junio desde La Habana, Cuba, hasta una aproximación del 15 de junio al Costa europea. La parte inferior del mapa incluye una imagen insertada de un gran barco con banderas en sus mástiles y las palabras Hamburgo, 13 de mayo de 1939, Amberes, 17 de junio. El mapa está subtitulado:


Mapa de la travesía del St. Louis. Mayo–Junio 1939. Cortesía de los Archivos del JDC. 


Debajo del mapa hay un gráfico circular titulado: Tasas de supervivencia de los pasajeros de St. Louis por país de desembarco. El gráfico circular se divide en cinco secciones. Comenzando en la parte superior derecha y en sentido horario, hay una sección azul etiquetada: Bélgica, 214 pasajeros. Muestra que el 60% fueron sobrevivientes y el 40% fueron muertes. La siguiente sección es de color naranja y etiquetada: Cuba, 28 pasajeros. Muestra 100% supervivientes. La siguiente sección es de color rosa y está etiquetada: Inglaterra, 289 pasajeros. Muestra 100% supervivientes. La siguiente sección es de color verde y etiquetada: Francia, 224 pasajeros. Muestra un 62% de supervivientes y un 38% de muertes. La sección final es de color amarillo y está etiquetada: Países Bajos, 181 pasajeros. Muestra 54% de sobrevivientes y 46% de muertes.


 


Debajo del gráfico circular hay un título que dice:


De los 937 pasajeros en el St. Louis, 931 eran refugiados. El 72% de los refugiados sobrevivió a la guerra repartidos en Cuba, Inglaterra, Francia, Bélgica y Paises Bajos, y el 28% falleció. 


La sección inferior del panel incluye una fotografía en blanco y negro que muestra a una niña de pie junto a su padre y su madre frente a un edificio de ladrillos. La fotografía está rayada o descolorida, difuminando las líneas entre las tres figuras vestidas de oscuro. Está subtitulado:  Ilse, Karl y Selma Simon en los Países Bajos. 1940 – 1942. Cortesía de Susan Heinemann Berman.


El texto de la sección inferior del panel dice lo siguiente: Ruth y Hildegard recibieron una carta de su madre en 1943 en la que les aconsejaba “sean fuertes y trabajen eficientemente”. Ilse añadió una nota que decía “¡Estoy del tamaño de mamá!”. Solo después de la guerra Ruth y Hildegard se enteraron que sus padres y hermana menor habían sido asesinados en Sobibor el 21 de mayo de 1943. 


Todos los paneles incluyen un fondo de agua azul en la parte superior e inferior con una sección principal superpuesta por tonos de púrpura y una sección inferior superpuesta en verde azulado. El texto en inglés aparece a la izquierda y el texto en español a la derecha.


Audioguía de La tragedia de St. Louis, Panel 8:

El Legado del St. Louis


Una fotografía en blanco y negro en la parte superior del panel muestra a un joven con camisa blanca y gorra patinando sobre la cubierta de madera de un barco. Un grupo de hombres y mujeres charlan detrás de él. La fotografía está subtitulada: El refugiado judío Georg Lenneberg con patines en la cubierta del St. Louis. 13-17 de mayo de 1939. Museo Estadounidense Conmemorativo del Holocausto. Cortesía de Fred Buff.


En la parte superior central de la parte principal del panel, hay una reproducción de un dibujo infantil de un barco. El barco tiene un casco negro y cubiertas blancas con un gran ancla azul en su popa y St. Louis escrito en rojo en su proa. Sobrevolando el barco hay banderas de varias nacionalidades, incluidas Alemania y Cuba. Escritas en amarillo, rojo y azul en la parte inferior de la imagen están las palabras The German Ship St. Louis from Habana to Antw. Las imágenes están subtituladas:


Dibujo de una niña de 11 años, Liesel Joseph, realizado en agosto 1939 luego de llegar a Inglaterra después del retorno forzoso del St. Louis desde Cuba. Colección en el Museo Estadounidense Conmemorativo del Holocausto. Regalo de Liesel Joseph Loeb.


El texto del cuerpo principal dice lo siguiente:


La esperanza e incertidumbre sentida por los pasajeros del St. Louis puede apreciarse en las fotografías que se tomaron a bordo del barco. Ellos están sonrientes, bailando, patinando, haciendo “audiciones” para ser vecinos y amigos en un nuevo mundo. Para las personas que siguieron su difícil situación, ellos eran individuos reales con personalidad y potencial. Sin embargo, para las naciones donde buscaron consuelo, ellos eran simplemente números de un cupo. Y ese cupo no podía cambiarse, ni estar sujeto a miedos ni a distracciones ni a la inacción de los políticos, borrando cualquier rastro de humanidad. La historia del St. Louis nos recuerda que la retórica y la política son poderosas. Para las personas que buscan refugio, las políticas restrictivas pueden tener el poder de terminar con sus vidas de manera prematura.


Hay una fotografía en color en el centro de la sección inferior del panel que muestra a cuatro mujeres sonrientes frente a una ventana. Una mujer joven se encuentra a la izquierda junto a tres mujeres mayores de pelo corto y gafas que se parecen mucho entre sí. La imagen está subtitulada:


Susan Heinemann Berman, Ruth Simon Heinemann, Edith Simon Babich y Hildegard Simon Gernsheimer, 1990. Cortesía de Susan Heinemann Berman.


El texto de la sección inferior del panel dice lo siguiente:


Las tres hermanas Simon sobrevivientes celebraron el final de la Segunda Guerra Mundial y buscaron el sueño americano. En 1947, Ruth se casó con Manfred Heinemann. Un año después, nació su hija Susan. Actualmente reside en Kennesaw, Georgia. Susan Heinemann Berman ha ayudado a preservar el legado de su familia.


Todos los paneles incluyen un fondo de agua azul en la parte superior e inferior con una sección principal superpuesta por tonos de púrpura y una sección inferior superpuesta en verde azulado. El texto en inglés aparece a la izquierda y el texto en español a la derecha.

Original Format

mp3

Duration

24 minutes

Bit Rate/Frequency

34.8 MB

Files

Audio Guide for the Tragedy of the St. Louis Introduction
Audio Guide for the Tragedy of the St. Louis Panel 1 Part 1
Audio Guide for the Tragedy of the St. Louis Panel 1 Part 2
Audio Guide for the Tragedy of the St. Louis Panel 2 Part 1
Audio Guide for the Tragedy of the St. Louis Panel 2 Part 2
Audio Guide for the Tragedy of the St. Louis Panel 3 Part 1
Audio Guide for the Tragedy of the St. Louis Panel 3 Part 2
Audio Guide for the Tragedy of the St. Louis Panel 4 Part 1
Audio Guide for the Tragedy of the St. Louis Panel 4 Part 2
Audio Guide for the Tragedy of the St. Louis Panel 5 Part 1
Audio Guide for the Tragedy of the St. Louis Panel 5 Part 2
Audio Guide for the Tragedy of the St. Louis Panel 6 Part 1
Audio Guide for the Tragedy of the St. Louis Panel 6 Part 2
Audio Guide for the Tragedy of the St. Louis Panel 7 Part 1
Audio Guide for the Tragedy of the St. Louis Panel 7 Part 2
Audio Guide for the Tragedy of the St. Louis Panel 8 Part 1
Audio Guide for the Tragedy of the St. Louis Panel 8 Part 2

Citation

Museum of History and Holocaust Education, “Audio Guide for The Tragedy of the St. Louis,” Meet History, accessed November 27, 2020, https://meethistory.kennesaw.edu/items/show/84.

Output Formats

Item Relations

This item has no relations.

Geolocation